Posts Tagged ‘children’

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Coming Out Of The Dark’s Female Eye Film Festival Picks

March 23, 2010

The 8th Annual Female Eye Film Festival takes place in Toronto, Ontario March 24 – 28, 2010 at Rainbow Cinemas

Here are some film highlights that may interest Coming Out Of The Dark community

THE LINE dir Nancy Schwartzman A documentary film examining boundaries and sexual consent. A one night stand far from home turns into a sexual nightmare. As the filmmaker unravels her experience, she decides to confront her attacker.

Told through a “sex-positive” lens, THE LINE is a 24 minute documentary about a young woman – the filmmaker- who is raped, but her story isn’t cut and dry. Not a “perfect victim,” the filmmaker confronts her attacker, recording the conversation with a hidden camera. Sex workers, survivors and activists discuss justice, accountability and today’s “rape culture.” The film asks the question: where is the line defining consent?

The Line is more than a short documentary film, director Schwartzman has created a movement which asks the question WHERE IS YOUR LINE?  A group blog on consent, sex, pleasure, and ways we can ask for it. Through readers stories, photos, and comments, the hope is a place where we can dig deeper into all the questions raised by the film. The Line invites all voices, genders and opinions (as long as they’re respectful) to this space.

Website – www.whereisyourline.org Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/THE-LINE/100417449352 Twitter http://twitter.com/thelinecampaign

CLOSING GALA: NOTHING SPECIAL (North American Premiere) In her debut feature film, writer/director Angela Garcia Combs spins a dark and funny tale of a beautiful young woman at a crucial turning point in her career and her relationship with her bi-polar mother. Louise (Julia Garcia Combs) is an insurance underwriter living in Los Angeles with her mother, May (Karen Black), who has recently been evicted from her Section 8 apartment after the building was condemned. May’s shaky grip on her emotions begins to loosen when she becomes aware of the close relationship between Louise and her trailblazing boss, Catherine (Barbara Bain), whom Louise admires and adores.

Catherine is secretly fighting cancer and has an estranged relationship with her own daughter, and reaches out to Louise as a surrogate. At the same time, Catherine is pushing Louise to accept a big promotion, which will compel Louise to relocate to New York. Things heat up when May and Catherine meet by chance on Mother’s Day and an alarming confrontation ensues. Throw into the mix a budding romance between Louise and the local bartender, and we find ourselves in the midst of a gripping story of the joys and heartaches of mother-daughter relationships, and the intense emotional lives of three remarkable women living in the shadow of the Hollywood sign.

LOVE AT THE TWILIGHT MOTEL, dir by Alison Rose, weaves seven confessional interviews with guests of an hourly motel. Sex, infidelity and the allure of the fast lane propel their stories. The filmmaker doesn’t comment or judge as she peals back the layers of their stories. In the privacy of the bedroom, men and women become candidly revealing, dark and funny, transcending the limits of their circumstances, and redeeming themselves with their story telling. (Doc, 82:00, Toronto, CAN)

How Are You, co- dirs Susan Coyne and Martha Burns. How Are You? is a comedy about grief – the ordinary, everyday kind of grief that comes to us all. Olivia Kay, newly separated, must get through Valentine’s Day while enduring a series of awkward encounters with people, who ask “How Are You?”… but can’t wait for an answer. Her amusing yet devastating run-ins lead inexorably to the one encounter she needs and fears the most: herself. (Comedy, 17:00, Toronto, CAN)

The Real Matriarch dir Rhonda Buckley. The Real Matriarch takes a look at the politics, life and professions of four prominent women from Newfoundland and Labrador: Lois Brown, Barbara Doran, Edythe Goodridge, and Mrs. Sara Sexton. They are entertaining, shocking at times, and ultimately great storytellers. Their work with women’s groups, aids patients, artists, filmmakers, and community groups is acknowledged nationally. Spanning four generations and while raising children they have held their battles wildly and never stepped down. Always leaving a boardroom or a dining room in laughter. (WP, Doc. 45:00, NFLD, CAN)

La Luz Del Perdon (The Light of Forgiveness), dir Eileen Richardson. La Luz del Perdón is a hand processed hand manipulated film journey of emotions and a personal documentary that uses abstract imagery to represent the fear of rejection, homosexuality, memories of childhood and the ultimate light found in forgiveness. (TP, 15:00, Denver, USA)

PLAN B, SINGLE WOMEN CHOOSING MOTHERHOOD, dir Beth Cramer. Romance, love, marriage, what every girl thinks of as Plan A for their lives. Reality is women are staying single longer, pursuing careers and playing the field. These women now face the tough question of how to start a family without a
partner. (CP, Doc, 70:00, NY, USA)

For complete program schedule and film details visit http://www.femaleeyefilmfestival.com

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Artist Charmaine Loverin

December 10, 2009

Canadian Artist and Child Sexual Abuse Survivor/Activist Charmaine Loverin explains her latest 3 piece canvas artwork and the “I Have Something To Ask…” Project.  Photography By Diane Foy

Part 2 – Charmaine Loverin Loving My Sinner, Hating His Sin

Part 3 – Charmaine Loverin Making  A Difference For Children

Visit Charmaine Loverin’s Website

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Miss America By Day

November 12, 2009

In her book, Miss America By Day – Lessons Learned from Ultimate Betrayals and Unconditional Love, Marilyn Van Derbur, a former Miss America, tells the story of how she was sexually violated by her prominent, millionaire father from age 5 to age 18. She was 53 years old before she was able to speak the words in public, “I am an incest survivor.” She opened the door for tens of thousands of sexual abuse survivors to also speak the words, many for the first time, within their own families and communities.

Marilyn describes, in detail, what specific “work” she did on her journey from victim to survivor. After learning of a woman’s rape, Marilyn heard a close friend say, “It was a bad 20 minutes.” In the hope that rape and sexual abuse will no longer be as easily dismissed or minimized, Marilyn writes for the first time about what her father did to her and what the impact has been on her adult life.

Using her story as the scaffolding, she shares knowledge and insights she has gained through speaking personally with adult survivors of sexual abuse across the country. Marilyn has been in personal contact with more survivors than anyone in America. She has personally answered over 8,000 letters and spoken in 225 cities. Survivors line up for two to three hours to tell her their stories.

Marilyn’s major motivation in writing the book came as a result of hearing these words literally thousands of times: “When I was 7 and my brother was 13…” Only the ages changed.

The most frequently reported age when sexual abuse begins is between 5 and 6 years old and common offenders are older brothers and teenage baby-sitters (both male and female). Suprisingly, 14 -year-olds comprise the largest number of sex offenders of any age group.

With her extensive research on the long-term impact of trauma and her belief that sexual abuse prevention is the best weapon for keeping our children safe, Marilyn urges parents to talk with children, as young as five, and provides suggested guidelines for important conversations that will, hopefully, evolve into continuous dialogues.

Knowing that vulnerable children are targets, she gives unique ways of building children’s self esteem.

Read how she responds to: “This happened decades ago.” “How could you forget?” “Are there really ‘false memories’?” “Can ‘just fondling’ cause as much trauma as rape?” “Did you forgive?” “How did you develop a satisfying sexual relationship?” The major theme that ties the book together is how her marriage continued to thrive during her darkest years of recovery.  Long list of Resources on her website

Two important videos to watch from former Miss America Marilyn Van Derbur

(Just a note – I have not read this book, only came across the story & thought I needed to make the video interview  heard)