Posts Tagged ‘Addiction Recovery’

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MentalHealthCamp

March 22, 2010

— an unconference about Mental Health

May 28, 2010, at the Bram and Bluma Appel Salon, Toronto Reference Library

An Unconference?

Those of us with a mental illness think differently than “normal” anyways so what ever an unconference is sounds fun.  Let’s face it a traditional conference about mental health does not sound like fun at all.  Who’s up for breaking rules and tradition?

Wikipedia states that an unconference is a facilitated, participant-driven conference entered on a theme or purpose. The term “unconference” has been applied, or self-applied, to a wide range of gatherings that try to avoid one or more aspects of a conventional conference. In this case there will be no advance schedule and the outline of the day will be made up in the morning based on attendees interests on mental health.

Who is the MentalHealthCamp for?

* Mental illness indirectly affects all Canadians at some time through a family member, friend or colleague.

* 20% of Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime.

* Mental illness affects people of all ages, educational and income levels, and cultures.

* Facts: Canadian Mental Health Association

MentalHealthCamp is for mental health professionals, people living with or past mental health problems, a family member or friend of a person with mental health problems, or has a passion or an interest in the topic. MHCTO also welcomes technophiles, change architects and all sorts of social media types.

These days many of us seem to be on all the latest social media sites and online communities and we search the internet often for information and news. Mental Health Camp’s goal is to ignite conversations around how can we use these technologies to promote better mental health and help improve the lives of people with mental health problems.

MentalHealthCamp topics may include:

• How blogging, Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks can impact people’s mental health
• Privacy in the e-health era
• How we can start early with youth to reduce stigma using tools they are comfortable with

Attendees will have the chance to jot down these or any other conversation topic on an agenda and lead or co-lead a session! Or find a topic that interests you and engage in the discussion. All your questions are valid. Please come prepared to dialogue about the future of mental health 2.0.

The age of digitization and technology enabled living is here and has catalyzed a new paradigm of participation. Please bring your ideas, questions and open minds as we work on solutions that are possible today and that we are dreaming about for tomorrow.

Ready To Sign Up?

Registration is $25 http://guestlistapp.com/events/16869

MentalHealthCamp Toronto (MHCTO) builds on the experience of the international HealthCamp movement and the first MentalHealthCamp held in Vancouver in 2009.  (MHCTO) website: mentalhealthcampto.org Twitter: @MHCTO (the organizers @CreativeFusion, @MadPsych, @nocx)

Friday, May 28 at 8:00 am ET – Toronto Reference Library – Bram & Bluma Appel Salon 789 Yonge Street Toronto, Ontario  M4W 2G8 Canada

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Suicide: Common Warning Signs

February 22, 2010

Although individual motives for suicide vary, there are some common warning signs. These signs may indicate that someone is at risk or is having personal, family or school problems.

Suicides seldom occur without warning. If you are aware of common signs and of changes in behaviour, you can recognize and better help a person in crisis. These signs represent behaviors that can serve as a warning sign. The warning signs are usually physical, emotional and behavioral in nature:

Physical Signs

  • Neglect of personal appearance.
  • Sudden changes in manner of dress, especially when the new style is completely out of character.
  • Chronic or unexplained illness, aches and pains.
  • Sudden weight gain or loss.
  • Sudden change in appetite.

Emotional Clues

  • Sense of hopelessness, helplessness or futility.
  • Inability to enjoy or appreciate friendships.
  • Wide mood changes and sudden outbursts.
  • Anxiousness, extreme tension and agitation.
  • Lethargy or tiredness.
  • Changes in personality: from outgoing to withdrawn, from polite to rude, from compliant to rebellious, from well-behaved to “acting out.”
  • Loss of the ability to concentrate; daydreaming.
  • Depression, sadness.
  • Loss of rational thought.
  • Feelings of guilt and failure.
  • Self-destructive thoughts.
  • Exaggerated fears of cancer, AIDS or physical impairment.
  • Feelings of worthlessness or of being a burden.
  • Loss of enjoyment from activities formerly enjoyed.

Behavioral Signs

  • Decreased school activity; isolation. Sudden drop in achievement and interest in school subjects.
  • Loss of interest in hobbies, sports, work etc.
  • Unexplained use of alcohol or other drugs.
  • Increased use of alcohol or other drugs.
  • Withdrawal from family and former friends, sometimes acting in a manner which forces others away.
  • Changes in eating and/or sleeping habits.
  • Changes in friendship.
  • Running away from home; “skipping school.”
  • Accident proneness and increase in risk-taking behavior such as careless driving, bike accidents, dangerous use of firearms.
  • Sexual promiscuity.
  • Giving away prized possessions (e.g. CD collection).
  • Preoccupation with thoughts of death.
  • Sudden changes in personality.
  • Making a will; writing poetry or stories about suicide or death.
  • Quietly putting affairs in order, “taking care of business.”
  • Threatening suicide.
  • Hoarding pills, hiding weapons, describing methods for committing suicide.
  • Previous suicide attempts.

While all of these signs may indicate that a person is experiencing problems, the last five behavioral signs are especially significant. (These signs indicate that a decision to complete suicide may have been made.) A previous attempt is a particularly important sign. Such an attempt increases the risk of future ones. In any of the signs, the key word is CHANGE.

The symptoms of depression, including the list of “acting out” behaviors and the common warning signs for suicide are very similar. Together, they provide ways to recognize a person at risk.

Source: Government of  Saskatchewan

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Mo’nique Wins Golden Globe Award For Precious

January 18, 2010

Mo'nique poses with her Golden Globe

Mo’nique’s powerful Golden Globes acceptance speech

Mo’nique’s Golden Globe press conference interview

“I think for so long, we swept it under the carpet, for so long when it’s time to deal with THAT issue, when it’s time to deal with molestation inside the home, we walk away from it.  We don’t address it so often times we live a lifetime with those demons and not really dealing with it so we continue to have a damaged life and it’s time to stop that, it’s time for us to heal and be survivors and no longer be victims.”

Precious Trailer

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Whitney Houston “I Didn’t Know My Own Strength”

November 8, 2009

Oprah’s 2 day interview with Whitney Houston was very powerful, I was in awe of Whitney’s honesty, bravery and strength. I’d have already heard the album and this song, however, I didn’t get it’s power until she performed it on Oprah after telling all she went through. I’m so happy to see Whitney is back from losing herself and is reclaiming her life. I’m inspired.

Watch the performance on Oprah http://www.oprah.com/media/20090903-tows-whitney-houston-sings

Whitney Houston – I Didn’t Know My Own Strength

Lost touch with my soul
I had no where to turn
I had no where to go
Lost sight of my dream,
Thought it would be the end of me
I thought I’d never make it through
I had no hope to hold on to,
I thought I would break

I didn’t know my own strength
And I crashed down, and I tumbled
But I did not crumble
I got through all the pain
I didn’t know my own strength
Survived my darkest hour
My faith kept me alive
I picked myself back up
Hold my head up high
I was not built to break
I didn’t know my own strength

Found hope in my heart,
I found the light to life
My way out the dark
Found all that I need
Here inside of me
I thought I’d never find my way
I thought I’d never lift that weight
I thought I would break

I didn’t know my own strength
And I crashed down, and I tumbled
But I did not crumble
I got through all the pain
I didn’t know my own strength
Survived my darkest hour
My faith kept me alive
I picked myself back up
Hold my head up high
I was not built to break
I didn’t know my own strength

There were so many times I
Wondered how I’d get through the night I
Thought took all I could take

I didn’t know my own strength
And I crashed down, and I tumbled
But I did not crumble
I got through all the pain
I didn’t know my own strength
Survived my darkest hour
My faith kept me alive
I picked myself back up
Hold my head up high
I was not built to break
I didn’t know my own strength